Psychedelics have come a long way since the Summer of Love thanks to the new Trip app. Back in the late 1960’s characters like Ken Kesey and beat generation writer Neal Cassady introduced legions of followers to taking LSD and mushrooms (among other drugs). If Kesey and Cassady were court jesters, Timothy Leary was the king of tripping, and famously encourage people to, “Turn on, Tune in, Drop out”.

The Trip app blends modern neuroscience with the wisdom of psychology to take you on a self-guided journey with expanding your mind. Whereas Leary encouraged users to free their mind, today’s psychedelic use is backed by for-profit companies capitalizing on the decriminalization of magic mushrooms, MDMA and other drugs.

With self-awareness is going mainstream, people are seeking answers within fueling the rise of meditation and a curious self-discovery trend.

Outside of Silicon Valley and Burning Man circles, psychedelics are still surrounded by many taboos and laws. But science is advancing rapidly and people are more open to alternative treatments. The Trip app’s Head of Product, Kori Harrison explained their evidence-based and responsible approach while designing Trip. “We spoke with experienced and new trippers, guides, psychologists, medical doctors, and combined those insights with the research from Mendel Kaelen, Stanislav Grof, MAPS, Roland Griffiths, Robin Carhart-Harris and others.”

Ronan Levy is the co-founder of Trip’s parent company Field Trip, a sort of spa for your mind. The company behind the app offers legal psychedelic-enhanced therapy, mindfulness, and self-care with a series of sessions with trained psychotherapists. Field Trip is open for business in New York, Toronto, and LA opening soon. The company plans to open 75 clinics in North America by 2024, Wired reports.

With psychedelics gaining popularity, one might ask why now? Millions of people battle depression every year. They seek out a variety of traditional pharmaceutical and psychiatric treatments. Psilocybin (the active compound in magic mushrooms) has shown great promise in treating depression. With the world in a clutches of an ugly pandemic, anxiety and depression are on the rise. And for those sheltering in place in the safety of the home, Field Trip’s new app handily distills its consciousness-expanding protocols, making a guide—or at least a facsimile of one—accessible whether you can find someone to guide you or not.

For seasoned trippers, using Trip will be a breeze, but for a whole new generation of folks looking to expand their mind, Trip will be a useful guide to help users feel safe and insightful.